Tire Size List And All You Need To Know About Wheel

Understanding your vehicle’s tire size is crucial for its performance and safety. The tire size, often found on the sidewall of your tire, is a series of numbers and letters that hold significant information about your tire’s specifications. This guide will help you know what these numbers mean and how to choose the right tire size for your vehicle.

Tire sizes are typically represented in the Width/Aspect Ratio R Rim Diameter format. The width and aspect ratio can calculate the tire’s sidewall height. The aspect ratio is a percentage. So, for a tire size 205 50r17, the sidewall height would be 50% of 205 mm, and the rim size would be 17.

Calculating Tire Sizes

Tire Size List And All You Need To Know About Wheel

Section Width: This is the width of the tire, measured in millimeters. It is the first number in the tire size marking.

Aspect Ratio: A tire’s aspect ratio refers to the height of the tire’s section divided by its width. It is the second number in the tire size marking.

Sidewall Height: The distance from the edge of the tire to the wheel is known as sidewall height. It is calculated by multiplying the tire’s width by the aspect ratio. 

Tire Diameter: This is the distance from one side of the tire to the other. It is calculated by multiplying the sidewall by two and adding the rim diameter. 

Tire Circumference: The tire circumference is the measurement of the distance around the outer edge of the tire.

We’ve sorted the tires based on their rim sizes first, then by the calculated sidewall height.

Tire Size list 13 To 17 Rim Size:

Rim SizeTire SizeWidth (mm)Aspect Ratio (%)Sidewall Height (mm)
13145/70 R1314570101.5
13155/70 R1315570108.5
13165/70 R1316570115.5
13175/65 R1317565113.75
13175/70 R1317570122.5
13185/70 R1318570129.5
14155/65 R1415565100.75
14165/60 R141656099
14165/65 R1416565107.25
14165/70 R1416570115.5
14175/65 R1417565113.75
14185/60 R1418560111
14175/70 R1417570122.5
14185/65 R1418565120.25
14195/60 R1419560117
14195/65 R1419565126.75
14175/80 R1417580140
14185/70 R1418570129.5
15185/55 R1518555101.75
15185/60 R1518560111
15195/50 R151955097.5
15195/55 R1519555107.25
15185/65 R1518565120.25
15195/60 R1519560117
15205/60 R1520560123
15195/65 R1519565126.75
15205/65 R1520565133.25
15195/70 R1519570136.5
15205/70 R1520570143.5
15215/70 R1521570150.5
15225/70 R1522570157.5
15215/75 R1521575161.25
15225/75 R1522575168.75
15235/75 R1523575176.25
15255/75 R1525575191.25
15265/70 R1526570185.5
16195/45 R161954587.75
16205/55 R1620555112.75
16195/55 R1619555107.25
16215/40 R162154086
16215/45 R162154596.75
16205/50 R1620550102.5
16215/55 R1621555118.25
16225/55 R1622555123.75
16215/65 R1621565139.75
16205/60 R1620560123
16215/60 R1621560129
16235/70 R1623570164.5
16225/70 R1622570157.5
16245/70 R1624570171.5
16255/70 R1625570178.5
16265/70 R1626570185.5
17205/40 R172054082
17205/45 R172054592.25
17215/40 R172154086
17215/45 R172154596.75
17225/45 R1722545101.25
17235/45 R1723545105.75
17245/40 R172454098
17245/45 R1724545110.25
17205/50 R1720550102.5
17205/55 R1720555112.75
17215/50 R1721550107.5
17215/55 R1721555118.25
17225/50 R1722550112.5
17225/55 R1722555123.75
17235/55 R1723555129.25
17245/ 45 R1724545110.25
17235/ 65 R1723565152.75
17225/ 65 R1722565146.25
17255/ 60 R1725560153
17225/ 60 R1722560135
17215/ 60 R1721560129
17215/ 65 R1721565139.75
17265/ 70 R1726570185.5

Tire Size list 18 To 21 Rim Size:

Rim SizeTire SizeWidth (mm)Aspect Ratio (%)Sidewall Height (mm)
18225/40 R182254090
18225/45 R1822545101.25
18235/40 R182354094
18235/45 R1823545105.75
18245/40 R182454098
18245/45 R1824545110.25
18255/45 R1825545114.75
18255/55 R1825555140.25
18235/55 R1823555129.25
18255/60 R1825560153
18265/60 R1826560159
19225/40 R192254090
19235/55 R1923555129.25
19245/40 R192454098
19245/45 R1924545110.25
19255/45 R1925545114.75
19245/50 R1924550122.5
19255/50 R1925550127.5
19255/55 R1925555140.25
20245/40 R202454098
20245/45 R2024545110.25
20255/50 R2025550127.5
20255/55 R2025555140.25
20265/45 R2026545119.25
20275/40 R2027540110
20275/45 R2027545123.75
20265/50 R2026550132.5
21295/35 R2129535103.25
21285/40 R2128540114
21295/40 R2129540118

Difference between R and C in tire sizes

Regarding tire sizes, the letters ‘R’ and ‘C’ play a significant role. ‘R’ stands for Radial construction, typical in passenger cars and light truck tires. Radial construction means the tire’s internal ply cords are oriented in a radial direction, from one bead to the other, providing excellent strength and flexibility and helping create a comfortable ride.

On the other hand, ‘C’ usually indicates ‘Commercial.’ Tires marked with a ‘C’ are designed for commercial vehicles or vans that require higher load-bearing capacities. These tires are built to withstand the heavy demands of commercial use.

Choosing the right tire size for your car

Choosing the right tire size for your car is essential for safety, performance, and fuel efficiency. You can find the tire size on the sidewall of your current tires, inside your car’s door jamb, or in the car’s manual. The replacement tires should match the manufacturer’s size, load index, and speed rating recommendations to ensure optimal performance and safety.

Reading a tire sidewall

The sidewall of a tire contains a wealth of information. It includes the tire type, width, aspect ratio, construction type (e.g., radial), rim diameter, load index, and speed rating. For example, a tire size of 225/50R17 means the tire has a section width of 225mm, an aspect ratio of 50%, is of Radial construction, and fits a 17-inch rim.

Difference between aspect ratio and section width

The aspect ratio and section width are two critical measurements on a tire. The aspect ratio is the sidewall height as a percentage of the section width. For instance, if a tire has an aspect ratio of 50, the height is 50% of the width.

On the other hand, the section width is the measurement from the inner to the outer sidewall, excluding any protective ribs, decorations, or raised letters. It’s the linear distance across the tire cross-section.

Knowing if your car needs commercial tires

Commercial tires are designed for vehicles or vans requiring higher load-bearing capacities. If you’re unsure whether your car needs commercial tires, refer to the vehicle’s manual or consult a tire professional. They can provide guidance based on your vehicle’s specifications and usage.

Measuring tire pressure

Measuring tire pressure is a simple process that can be done with a tire pressure gauge. First, remove the valve cap from your tire. Then, press the gauge onto the valve stem until the hissing sound stops. This indicates that air has stopped escaping from the tire. The reading on the indicator shows your tire’s pressure. Compare this reading to the recommended pressure in your vehicle’s manual or on a sticker inside the driver’s door.

Difference between summer and winter tires

Tires are designed differently based on the seasons they are intended for. Summer tires are firmer, have fewer grooves, and are suitable for temperatures above +7°C. They offer excellent performance in wet and dry conditions and provide optimal grip on warm roads.

Winter tires, on the other hand, have a higher natural rubber content and more grooves. They remain flexible in cold temperatures, offering better grip and traction in snowy or icy conditions. Winter tires are ideal for temperatures below +7°C.

Knowing when to replace your tires

Tire replacement is necessary when the tread depth is below 2/32nds of an inch or if the tires are over six years old, regardless of tread depth. Regularly inspect your tires for wear and damage to ensure your safety on the road.

Checking tire pressure

Checking tire pressure is similar to measuring it. First, remove the valve cap from your tire. Then, press the gauge onto the valve stem until the hissing sound stops. This indicates that air has stopped escaping from the tire. The reading on the indicator shows your tire’s pressure. Compare this reading to the recommended pressure in your vehicle’s manual or on a sticker inside the driver’s door.

Difference between R and ZR in tire speed ratings

The letters ‘R’ and ‘ZR’ in tire sizes refer to different aspects. ‘R’ denotes Radial construction, typical in passenger cars and light truck tires. On the other hand, ‘ZR’ indicates a tire has high-speed capability. Tires with a ‘ZR’ rating are designed to handle speeds above 240 km/h.

Knowing if your tires are correctly inflated

Proper tire inflation is crucial for optimal performance and safety. To know if your tires are correctly inflated, measure the pressure with a gauge and compare it to the recommended pressure. The recommended pressure is usually found in your vehicle’s manual or a sticker inside the driver’s door.

Rotating tires

Rotating tires involves changing the positions of your vehicle’s tires to promote even wear. The specific pattern for rotating tires depends on the vehicle type, tire wear patterns, and the type of tires (directional/non-directional). Regular tire rotation can extend the life of your tires and improve your vehicle’s performance.

Choosing a tire size for your car

Choosing the right tire size for your car is essential for safety, performance, and fuel efficiency. You can find the tire size on the sidewall of your current tires, inside your car’s door jamb, or in the car’s manual. The replacement tires should match the manufacturer’s size, load index, and speed rating recommendations to ensure optimal performance and safety.

About rim sizes

Rim size refers to the diameter of the tire’s bead seating area, measured in inches. It’s an essential factor when choosing new tires. For example, a tire size of 225/50R17 means the tire is designed for a rim with a 17-inch diameter.

Replacing car’s tires

Tires should be replaced when the tread depth is below 2/32nds of an inch or if the tires are over six years old, regardless of tread depth. Regularly inspect your tires for wear and damage to ensure your safety on the road.

Reading a tire size code

A tire size code is a series of numbers and letters on the sidewall of your tire that provides essential information about the tire’s specifications. The code includes the section width (the linear distance across the tire cross-section), aspect ratio (the height of the tire’s cross-section as a percentage of the section width), construction type (e.g., radial), and rim diameter (the diameter of the wheel from one bead seat to the other). Understanding these codes can help you choose the right tire for your vehicle.

Additional Things Drivers Should Know About Their Tires:

  1. Tire Age:
    • Tires degrade over time, even if the tread is still good. Check the manufacturing date on the sidewall to determine the tire’s age.
  2. Tire Load Capacity:
    • Each tire has a load-carrying capacity. Not exceeding this limit is crucial, as it can affect handling and safety. The load capacity is indicated by the load index on the sidewall.
  3. Tire Tread Wear Indicators:
    • Tires have built-in tread wear indicators (usually bars) that become visible as the tread wears down. When these indicators are visual, it’s a sign that the tire may need replacement.
  4. Driving Conditions:
    • Different tires are designed for specific driving conditions. Consider whether you need all-season, summer, or winter tires based on your area’s climate and driving conditions.
  5. Tire Rotation Schedule:
    • Regular tire rotation helps ensure even wear on all tires, extending their lifespan. Follow the recommended rotation schedule outlined in your vehicle’s manual.
  6. Alignment and Balancing:
    • Proper wheel alignment and balancing contribute to even tire wear. If you notice uneven wear patterns, vibrations, or the vehicle pulling to one side, it may be time for alignment or balancing.
  7. Pothole and Road Damage:
    • Be cautious of potholes and road debris, as they can cause damage to tires, including bulges, cuts, or punctures. Regularly inspect your tires for any visible signs of damage.
  8. Spare Tire Condition:
    • Check the condition of your spare tire periodically. Ensure it is properly inflated and the tread is in good condition, as it’s your backup in case of a flat or blowout.
  9. Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS):
    • Many modern vehicles have a TPMS that alerts you when tire pressure is low. Pay attention to these warnings and address low tire pressure promptly.
  10. Driving Habits:
    • Aggressive driving, high speeds, and sudden stops can contribute to increased tire wear. Drive responsibly to maintain the longevity of your tires.
  11. Emergency Tire Kit:
    • Familiarize yourself with the tools and instructions in your vehicle’s emergency tire repair kit. This kit may include a spare tire, jack, lug wrench, and instructions on how to use them.

Regular tire maintenance, periodic inspections, and prompt addressing of issues contribute to safer and more efficient driving. Always refer to your vehicle’s manual and consult with professionals for specific recommendations related to your vehicle and tire type.

Conclusion

Understanding tire sizes and how to read them is crucial for maintaining your vehicle’s performance and safety. Whether it’s choosing the right tire size for your car, knowing when to replace your tires, or understanding the difference between summer and winter tires, being informed helps you make the best decisions for your vehicle. Remember, it’s always best to consult a tire professional when in doubt.